Three dimensional time

Time, as we experience it, has different components sharing a common unit (such as seconds).   There is the scientific time that is analytic in a way that makes possible mechanistic models that are very successful at modeling the physical world.  There is the historic time that allows for growing intelligence made possible by the additional evidence that comes inevitably from the passage of time.   For intelligence to act upon the physical (mechanistic) world to exercise a free will, there is a component of time required for persuasion through some process that allows for selecting the opportunities presented by the otherwise indifferent physical world.

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Dark data: fall of civilizations

The rise of civilizations is from rapid adaptation of first-hand observations. The fall of civilizations occurs when theories override contrary observations. Government by data and urgency can restore the original vitality that created this civilization, and can prevent the inevitable decline resulting from theory-driven decision making.

Intelligence Question (IQ)

If I take a month to come up with some solution, then it is hard to argue that a non-human animal could not come up with an equivalent solution over a longer period of time.   Given enough time, Darwinian evolution could come up with the solution without any IQ type intelligence at all.  A definition of intelligence that is unique to humans demands a time limit on coming up with an answer.

What makes up the self

Following up on my last post, I am also wondering about where IQ comes from.   As noted there, there seems to be a genetic component to IQ because IQ tends to be stable over an individual’s lifetime, and there seems to be an environmental component since IQ scores have been increasing in recent generations.…

Presumption of incompetence: man vs machine

Behind this messy argument is a deeper concern I have that we are doing a disservice to young people by presuming that they really do need more than a decade to learn advanced skills. We can subject young people to more intense education than we are now, and that they could have college-graduate level skills before they become 18 years old. Yet, we think that such an expectation is unwise as if it risks losing something more valuable. Perhaps we fear the young person’s loss to easy access to the presumption of innocence.