Masters of Ignorance: effective data analysis

We should study observations separately from derivations from theories.   The deliberately ignorant takes the position that data is superior to science.   There is a valid place for the deliberately ignorant when included in teams with domain experts representing each of the relevant scientific disciplines.   In order to work, the deliberately ignorant needs to be skilled at his craft of being ignorant in the right way to propel the team towards a new solution without annoying everyone to the point of being expelled.

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How the world works

Over the four decades of my adult life there has been a recurring theme in my education and profession and that theme is that the world works on fundamental principles and atomic units.   In college, I recall the confidence that we can understand everything from quantum mechanics if only we had the computing power to…

Technology vs Biology

This is just a possible scenario of a synergy between humans and automation technology.   We need technology for its mastery of the time-domain.   Technology depends on us for survival due to our biologic advantages of solving problems in time-volume or in a frequency domain.

Three dimensional time

Time, as we experience it, has different components sharing a common unit (such as seconds).   There is the scientific time that is analytic in a way that makes possible mechanistic models that are very successful at modeling the physical world.  There is the historic time that allows for growing intelligence made possible by the additional evidence that comes inevitably from the passage of time.   For intelligence to act upon the physical (mechanistic) world to exercise a free will, there is a component of time required for persuasion through some process that allows for selecting the opportunities presented by the otherwise indifferent physical world.

Indifference to dark data

We should learn from recent experience of large data technologies the lesson that decision making can benefit from streaming data in addition to (and often instead of) the publication science of one-time experiments.    It is clear now that policy making needs access to a continuous stream fresh data about old ideas, especially when that data accumulates over time.   With access to the technologies to do this work, it is unacceptable to base policies on the failed approaches of the past that rely on published studies.