Imagining parallel economies divided by age cohorts

In this imagined economy, the notion of retirement will change fundamentally. Instead of defining retirement as an ideal of a life of leisure to strive for by working as long as possible, retirement is a transition from the young population to the old population. The older population may continue working indefinitely but no longer under long-term employment arrangement. The work will be short duration contracts that may require frequent retraining to prepare for future work.

Adapting to modern aging populations: government of two cohorts

The other government has a minimum voting age of 55. Upon reaching this age, a person can voluntarily participate in this part of government but when he does he forfeits his participation in the first government. Participation in this government should offer many advantages that will encourage this switch in participation. This government is responsible for all of the entitlement and personal benefit programs of the government. These are expenses unrelated to the operation of the government. Instead it is focused on the welfare of the people. While this will include welfare for younger adults, the bulk of the benefits will go to older people. This government will also be responsible for servicing all of the government debts, including operational debts likely incurred when the voters were younger.

More thoughts on setting an age limit on voting in a Democracy

The point of setting a maximum age limit is to restore the approximate relative influence of young people that they enjoyed during the very successful years of US democracy during the 19th and early 20th century. The upper age limit must be low enough to exclude sufficient number of people from voting so that the younger voters can have an appropriate level of influence on voting and policy-making. According my calculations from census bureau data, about 32% of the population is over 55, but only 16% is over 65, and only 7% is over 75. The 55 year age limit results in a significant shift in voting power to young people. Setting the age at 65 is much less effective and by 75 there is hardly an affect at all. In terms of numbers, 55 works great as an upper voting age limit.

Modern era of longer lifespans exposes fatal flaw of democracy: the need to disenfranchise the old

Assuming that a democracy is strongest when the demographics of the eligible voters are younger, we can redefine the eligibility for voting rights from the current eligibility to all adults to a new eligibility of all young adults. In other words, we need disenfranchise adults after they reach a certain age. This mimics what nature did for us in the 19th century. Older adults will continue to enjoy long lifespans and pension-like benefits. They will lose the opportunity to vote after a certain age.