2020s Prohibition Era 2.0

There is a case that the first prohibition failed because it was based on a moral justification and people can argue about what is moral or not. This second prohibition is on more solid ground based on a scientific justification. The justification now is scientific assurance that everyone will end up knowing someone who will die from this disease if the disease doesn’t kill them. We can’t deny science.

Navigating dark data: Ever Given in Suez

This navigation reminds me of the hyperspace short cuts in science fiction. In both cases, the ship is in a short cut where spatial properties are different from more routine conditions of open seas in deep waters. In both cases, the navigator must rely on information he had when he entered the short cut. The navigator has very little if any relevant measurements of what will really matter to the outcome of the journey.

Negative level autism

In context of distinguishing bright data of observations from the dark data of theory, I should categorize the existence of a scale itself to be a form of dark data. For a purely data driven decision making, it may be beneficial to prefer finding and defining clusters or categories instead of scales.

Dark nothing, dark data’s blind spot

There is a benefit to opening our processes to the possibility that the reality may be changing, where the changing is from an evolving intelligence or even from a plethora of competing intelligences that have transitions of power much like our political systems. Admitting dark data into our algorithms blinds us to this possibility, especially when we allow dark data to have priority over observations.

Urgency is dark data

A government by data could consider the observations of iatrogenic complications and deaths. The public’s fear of a virus could grant this government permission to impose some new authoritarian policy that would do something, but that something would exploit the opportunity to improve the future prospects based on all observations of the current world. Such a government would be free to decide to tackle the problem of iatrogenesis instead of the problem of the virus. Fixing the overextension of medicine may ultimately benefit more people than overreacting to a virus that is not as threatening as the population perceived.